KSBA In the News

KSBA In the News

The Kentucky School Boards Association represents members of local boards of education - the decision-makers on education in their communities. Because of this unique role, KSBA is often called on to discuss important school-related issues.
 
Louisville Courier Journal, July 31, 2018

Eric Kennedy, director of governmental relations for the Kentucky School Boards Association, said he's not surprised the two sides talking about an agreement "that's not takeover" but that he was surprised to see a written settlement offer and a deadline. Kennedy said he'd urge both sides to get clarity on exactly what the agreement would look like. For instance, he said, what if there is an issue that could be seen as a special-education issue but also as an issue that does not fall into the "enhanced oversight" areas?

Lexington Herald-Leader, July 31, 2018 
“Everyone feels nervous because of the uncertainty about the guidance over who is included (as a contractor) and who is not,” said Kennedy. “If there was one thing that’s affecting the district administrators and the school boards, we are hearing it’s that uncertainly. There’s potentially thousands of checks and a backlog and a time issue.”  
 
Frankfort State Journal, July 10, 2018 
Those wishing to serve on the boards of school districts must now show a transcript providing completion of high school or the results of a high school equivalency exam before being allowed to run for the office. The Kentucky School Boards Association is urging potential school board candidates to start looking for their transcripts immediately. "There may be delays in getting a copy of your transcript or test results and the filing deadline will not be extended if you can't get a copy to the county clerk before the deadline," KSBA warns.
 
Louisville Courier Journal, Jan. 21, 2018
KSBA Director of Governmental Relations Eric Kennedy said the budget proposal by Gov. Matt Bevin would hurt school districts with small reserves, forcing some to the brink of bankruptcy if they're hit with a natural disaster or some other major expense. "For the many districts that do not have a healthy reserve or fund balance, this could effectively be the emergency that breaks their back," he said. "We could see districts become insolvent during a school year. They would have no money to make payroll or meet their current expenses."
 
The Richmond Register, Jan. 19, 2018
KSBA Executive Director Kerri Schelling warns the budget cuts proposed by the governor will affect schools even if SEEK is fully funded. Less state money means local districts will have to cut other parts of the budget, dip into reserves or raise local taxes. “Local taxes are meant to supplement the primary investment in public education which must come from the state in order to achieve both adequacy and equity in every classroom,” said Schelling,. “But this budget asks for more of local districts to make up what the state is not funding and as a result Kentucky’s children will suffer.”
 
Lexington Herald-Leader, Jan. 17, 2018
KSBA Director of Governmental Relations Eric Kennedy said the proposed shift in costs for student transportation to local school districts "will be a significant concern" for many districts, especially those that are georgraphically larged or financially strained.
 
Elizabethtown News-Enterprise, Jan. 7, 2018
KSBA Director of Governmental Relations Eric Kennedy said he expects the state budget proposal to make drastic cuts to state agencies, including schools. He stressed that KSBA is working to protect base SEEK funding and money for other school services. 
 
Lexington Herald-Leader, Jan. 7, 2018 
KSBA Director of Communications Mary Branham discusses policies adopted by local boards of education with regard to use of sunscreen by students. Legislation filed in the 2018 legislative session would require schools to allow students to carry and self-apply sunscreen at school and school-related functions; it would also allow distict personnel to voluntarily help students with sunscreen.
 
KSBA Director of Governmental Relations Eric Kennedy points out that while Kentucky schools may not see a direct funding impact from the federal tax bill, they will be impacted because the overall financial investment in schools more and more falls on local school districts and local taxes.


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