Kentucky School Advocate - People are Talking

Kentucky School Advocate - People are Talking

People are Talking

People are Talking
"It’s not just filling out an evaluation anymore. We are trying to, with this tool, actually create better teachers... which in turn will create better students. If we want great teachers in the classroom, this will keep them there. But, this will also show if this isn’t quite the career for you. You’re not going to be able to hide what I would call bad teaching.” Symsonia Elementary School (Graves County) Principal Alison Gregory, standing at right, on implementation of the state’s Professional Growth and Effectiveness system (PGES) at her school. From the Paducah WPSD-TV News. Photo provided by Graves County Schools
 
 
 
“We want to be the Disney World of schools — we want kids to enjoy learning here. We want high rigor and kids to be engaged. For a little district, we keep hopping pretty good.” Eminence Independent Schools Superintendent Buddy Berry on instructional and technology initiatives being implemented this year, including retrofitting a used school bus to become a mobile classroom for a community in Uganda. From the Eminence Henry County Local.
 
“I want to promote those scholarships, not only for our students to receive that benefit and opportunity to help pay for their higher education, but also to help promote the Lyon County Scholarship Foundation. It’s important to me to be a small part of that board and just to know we can all pull together for the betterment of our kids.” New Lyon County Schools Superintendent Russ Tilford on the benefits of two local scholarship funds that help send graduates to postsecondary studies. From the Eddyville Herald-Ledger.
“We watch children every day walk past the cash register and then throw away things that we are forced, have forced them to take, essentially as a result of the federal requirements for lunches. There’s no guarantee that the things they bring from home are healthier, or that if they stop by the minute market on the way to school and what they grabbed at that point is a healthier option. We feel like, based on the way it’s going, we can do a better job locally than the federal government can in regards to what our kids in Fort Thomas want.” Fort Thomas Independent Schools Superintendent Gene Kirchner on his district’s decision to drop out of the federal free and reduced meals program over restrictions on types of food that can be provided to students. From the Cincinnati WLWT-TV News.
 
 
 
“Foremost in our minds were the kids, the student athletes and the band kids. This will work better for all of them. But the costs savings is a God-send. We’re having to watch every dollar. When we can get better facilities for over $100,000 less, give our nationally recognized Adair band facilities (what) they need, now, then it’s a win for everybody. The only thing hitting us in the face is the realization that this ought to have been done 10 years ago.” Adair County Schools Superintendent Alan Reed on plans to convert the site of a former school into a practice field for the award-winning high school band. From the Columbia Magazine.
 
“We’ve dreamed about this for so long, so I get a little emotional. We feel blessed.” Magoffin County Schools Board of Education Chairwoman Caroline Isaac at the groundbreaking of the district’s $40 million high school, funded by a local nickel tax and a special appropriation by the 2014 General Assembly. From the Salyersville Independent.
 
“Somerset has a long history of accepting Science Hill students as part of the Briar Jumper family and our children really enjoy and benefit from the terrific education they receive at Somerset High School. This is truly an example of cooperation that could be a model for other districts, not only throughout the state, but nationally.” Science Hill Independent Schools Superintendent Rick Walker on an agreement for resident status for graduates of the K-8 district to attend high school in Somerset Independent. From the Somerset Commonwealth-Journal.
 
“We have carved time into our schedule where every student in this building who needs extra help in reading and math will have time to get help. We have built a one-hour block of time at the end of the day for students who need intervention in reading and math. We have also built a 25-minute writing block into the schedule. (Students who don’t need the extra help) will be in extension classes—classes that may be of high interest, or clubs or other activities. If they are where they need to be on reading and math, we will have some type of extensions for them to do during that time. We will have a lot of opportunities with this. Every student will be doing something during this time.” Allen County Intermediate Center Principal Shawn Holland on changes in his school’s daily schedule designed to help struggling students. From the Scottsville Citizen-Times.
“Before, only juniors and seniors had access to school-provided laptops. Now, every high school student will receive a personal laptop for school use. Similar to our MacBook initiative, students will be able to take the computers home with them as well. We are excited to further expand the number of devices available to our students. By allowing all of our high school students to use the Lenovo computers, we can move the MacBooks down to the lower grades so that even more students are equipped with these powerful tools.” Carroll County Schools Superintendent Bill Hogan on expanding the district’s one-to-one computer program for students. From the Carrollton News-Democrat.
 
 
 
“Let’s say we have a Spanish club meeting. Does that Spanish club advisor have to be trained? Right now, we train X number of people in CPR in the building. We’re good during school hours, but during school-sponsored activities, having to have a person (with CPR training) would really put a strain on us. If it’s not specifically mandated in statute, is there a need to go that far?” Woodford County Schools Superintendent Scott Hawkins during a Local Superintendents Advisory Council discussion on proposed Department of Education regulatory language that would have required a CPR-trained adult on site for every school-sponsored event. From the Frankfort KSBA eNews Service.
 
“Teachers as leaders, in this portion, model 21st century skills like creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, communication. It also includes the use of digital tools, so teachers need to be modeling as learners, as well as leading them. We’ve been moving toward delivering those digital devices and helping teachers become leaders with using digital tools. As part of that we’ve hired our first technology integration coach.” Shelby County Schools Staff Developer Lora Shields on new professional development initiatives as part of the district’s Strategic Leadership Plan. From the Shelbyville Sentinel-News.
Sweet music
“There’s probably not five boards in Kentucky that teach piano keyboarding fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grade. A lot of our children that live out in these remote areas would never ever learn to play piano.” Bell County Schools Superintendent Yvonne Gilliam during a discussion of a contract to service the 17 pianos placed at the district’s schools. From the Middlesboro Daily News.
 
 
It is not that we have a rampant drug problem in our schools, but that we know that the future depends on children having the information they need to make wise decisions. There is a misconception that there are limitations on presenting programs like this in school settings. We needed a more comprehensive action plan that went beyond a once a year Red Ribbon Day or prom/graduation.” Augusta Independent Schools Superintendent Lisa McCane on a community coalition aimed at reducing substance abuse addictions.
 
“We are looking at the big picture, from early childhood investment all the way to high school. We can also incorporate some of it into the health curriculum. It is everybody working together.” Bracken County Schools Superintendent Jeff Aulick on the two districts’ efforts in the community group.
From the Maysville Ledger Independent
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