People are Talking

People are Talking

People are Talking

People are Talking
"We are really just trying to create an idea of culture and community inside of our school. I feel like in recent years Caverna’s gotten a bad reputation, and we’re going to change that. I want us to be a significant force in the community instead of just passively residing here.” Caverna Independent High School teacher Anthony Eyler on the creation of a student-initiated “humanitarian club” that began with a school cleanup day and has expanded to a series of community projects. From the Glasgow Daily Times. Photo provided by Caverna Independent Schools
 
 
 
 
“The initial offering of $10,000 was a little bit insulting to us because this will require additional funding for teachers and potentially administration. We’re going to be looking at different programs as to what’s feasible for our budget and yet offer the maximum services to children. I think it’s prudent that we go ahead and act now. We certainly have a need. We have a population of students whose needs I don’t think we’re meeting, and it’s incumbent upon this board to research all programs to facilitate the needs of those students.” McLean County Schools Superintendent Tres Settle on his board’s delayed decision to raise the high school dropout age there to 18. From the Calhoun McLean County News.
 
“This is a learned lesson to us (for) the future. We need to get them (the citizens) involved before we (shove) a tax down their throats.” Knox County Board of Education member Gordon Hinkle on the board’s unanimous decision to rescind a nickel facilities tax after opponents successfully collected signatures to force a referendum. From the Corbin Times-Tribune.
 
“Anything we don’t know a lot about tends to frighten us. But we are always going to do what we think is in the best interest of the kids and the staff. We’ve never intentionally put people in harm’s way.” Fayette County Schools Chief Operating Officer Mary Wright on the district’s actions to install a radon gas mitigation system in a three-year-old school. From the Lexington Herald-Leader.
 
“Maybe we could use what we are doing with priority schools, and give superintendents and school boards the authority to intervene earlier in focus schools after two to three years of low performance where they are just about to go off the cliff to priority status. Maybe you could go in and do a diagnostic review, like we do with priority schools, and determine whether the principal and site council have capacity to turn around the school. If the answer is ‘No,’ then the district needs to select the principal, and select the (turnaround) model, and go in there earlier before the school reaches priority status.” Education Commissioner Terry Holliday on his plans to propose a “middle ground” between opening Kentucky to charter schools and continuing the current process of addressing low-performing public schools. From the Frankfort KSBA eNews Service.
 
“My commitment is for universal preschool education, free. That’s where I think we need to go. Everything tells us now that if we invest in every child, the earlier we do the chances of their ability to thrive by third grade are radically changed.” Rep. Kelly Flood (D-Lexington), chairwoman of the House K-12 budget subcommittee, during a Kentucky Chamber of Commerce preview of the 2015 General Assembly. From the WUKY Radio in Lexington.
“When you pull a certificate up and it’s clean, you kind of assume it’s clean, that there is nothing else. That’s an assumption now we no longer make. If you ever had any misconduct with a student, you’re not going to be hired.” Newport Independent Schools Superintendent Kelly Middleton on changes in hiring practices in his district after it was learned that a teacher, now facing a sexual abuse charge involving a child, had a prior problem while employed with the Boone County Schools – an issue not “flagged” when the independent district checked the educator’s teaching certificate with the state Education Professional Standards Board. From the Fort Mitchell Kentucky Enquirer.
 
 
 
 
“As the Red Book requirements changed, it doubled the workload at the middle and high schools. The bookkeeper situation is something we really have to monitor – whether we take some workload off of them or look at additional help.” Spencer County Schools Superintendent Chuck Adams on an auditor’s urging that the district closely monitor the workload of its high school and middle school bookkeepers. From the Taylorsville Spencer Magnet.
 
“For administrators, it’s easy to get caught in doing reports behind the desk or doing the emails because we do get a lot of emails. I think it’s easy to do that so this kind of puts things in perspective and makes you prioritize that being out with the kids is the most important thing and if you can get out there as much as you can then everybody’s better off, really.” Heartland Elementary (Hardin County) School Principal Emily Campbell on participating in “No Office Day,” whereby school and district administrators spent the day in classrooms, cafeterias and just about anywhere in a school other than their regular offices. From the Elizabethtown News-Enterprise.
 
“Tardiness is the biggest thing we have heard through this program and a lot of the school systems have taken this and developed a whole criteria. The school system has helped us out tremendously. It’s not just economic development sitting up here talking about education; it’s the school system really taking a leadership role in this.” Marshall County Economic Development Project Administrator Wendy Baxter on how the local school district has addressed job readiness issues as part of the effort to become a Kentucky Work Ready Community. From the Benton Marshall County Tribune-Courier.
 
“It’s not exactly an offer too good for juniors and seniors in three Greenup County high schools to refuse, but it is an opportunity for students at Greenup County, Russell and Raceland-Worthington high schools to improve their scores on the ACT test mandated by state law. There are a number of programs and classes available designed to help students better prepare for the ACT, but many of them are so costly many families cannot afford to have their children take those classes and programs. Many parents of average students are not convinced the advantages their children may receive from attending ACT preparation classes justify their cost.” Portions of an editorial praising the three neighboring districts for creating a free preparation program to help students improve their scores on future ACT exams. From The Ashland Independent.
 
“They’re able to choose the computer during free time, and they’re able to do things more independently and on their own. Some students struggle with the mouse, so it’s good to have that touch-screen available but still be able to teach them how to use a mouse at the same time.” Bardstown Primary School special education teacher Margaret Smith on grant-funded expansion of touch-screen computers that are more user-friendly for her students. From the Bardstown Kentucky Standard
“As far as I am concerned, this is the ‘Ferguson’ of the school systems in the state of Kentucky.” Bill McReynolds, a member of Concerned Citizens Society, complaining about a Hopkins County board action changing a human resources director job – court-ordered in a 2002 racial discrimination case – to a coordinator position with fewer responsibilities and work days. From the Madisonville Messenger.
 
“To refer to this as ‘Ferguson’ is highly offensive to me. A man lost his life and we’re talking about a job issue. We can have dialogue, but to refer to what we are doing as ‘Ferguson,’ I take high offense to that.” Hopkins County Board of Education member Shannon Embry in one of the responses by district officials explaining how the job change was designed to allow a new hire to grow into director-level experience. From the Madisonville Messenger.
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