People are Talking

People are Talking

People are Talking

People are Talking
Quotes on education from across Kentucky
 
Kentucky School Advocate
July/August 2015 
 
"The end goal of CDA (Centre of Danville’s Attention) is not only to foster meaningful and inspirational relationships between the mentor/mentee pairs, but also to motivate these women to finish high school, go to college, and achieve things that they never believed they could, because they have somebody alongside cheering for them the whole way.” Centre College sophomore Sam Cook on her involvement in a mentoring partnership between the college and Danville Independent High School, whereby college students mentor high school minority female students to keep them on a strong educational track. From the Danville Advocate-Messenger. Photo provided by Danville Independent Schools
“Our pockets are hanging out at this point. I really hope this is the last change order, because we are out of money.” Carter County Board of Education Chairman Bryan Greenhill after his board approved another change order on a long-awaited elementary school renovation project. From the Grayson Journal-Times.
 
“We have right now 1,900 active members here. We offer lots of programs for our members and for our school kids. Our school kids get to use our facilities for free four days a week for two hours so it gives these kids some type of social club to join as well as giving a health benefit to them. We are constantly doing something here with the youth and student athletes plus we are still providing a great service to our members here. The Wellness Center is just a great place for this community.” Center Director John Petett to the Monroe County Board of Education on the value of the district-operated wellness center to various segments of the community. From the Tompkinsville Monroe County Citizen.
 
“It’s a big deal when you start talking about dollars and cents, too. Not only in the impact for the schools to have kids staying in the classroom and helping with attendance numbers, but for parents. If you only have a limited number of days that you can take off, and you have to take off half a day to go sit in a lobby somewhere with your child, you’ve missed a half day of pay.” Tennille Rushing, director of clinic operations at Mercy Medical Associates in Paducah, on the expansion of school-based health clinics to more McCracken County and Paducah Independent schools. From the Paducah Sun.
 
“The Early College Academy model and dual credit programs offer a rigorous and engaging curriculum which will help our students keep an academic edge during their junior and senior years of high school. Among the many benefits, students and families will also realize a significant cost savings in tuition and expenses normally associated with higher education.” Martin County Schools Superintendent Steve Meadows on an agreement to allow 10 students to study in a special program at the Big Sandy Community and Technical College Mayo campus. From the Prestonsburg Floyd County Times.
 
“It’s one thing to send kids to school and know they’re getting a good education, but when you know they’re eating in a clean place, that brings it to a whole new level. It really does.” East Bernstadt Independent Board of Education member Kim Jervis on a report that the school’s cafeteria had scored a perfect 100 in its inspection by the Laurel County Health Department. From the London Sentinel-Echo.
 
“When a student meets benchmarks on all state required end-of-course exams and ACT state benchmarks, all other graduation requirements are waived. The student doesn’t have to worry about having a certain number of English credits, health/P.E., etc.” Susan Ryan, coordinator for gifted education and workforce readiness for Elizabethtown Independent Schools, on the graduation of two high school juniors, the first in the district to take advantage of a new law creating an early graduation option. From the Elizabethtown News-Enterprise.
 
“We really push academics and we’ve received so much support from the community. That is really what makes our area noteworthy. People care about these students. It takes a lot of money to help the students travel to these competitions. There are so many wonderful businesses that have helped to sponsor us. We really want to thank everyone.” Johnson County Middle School Quick Recall Team coach Pam Burton on the relationship between community backing and her team’s undefeated run through the 2015 Junior National Academic Championship Tournament last month in Washington, D.C. From the Paintsville Herald.
“What a ride I’ve had. (It was) 23 years ago this month when I had the opportunity to interview for the job I’m doing today. This (also) makes 50 years this month that I’ve been in education.” Corbin Independent Schools Superintendent Ed McNeel, currently the longest tenured superintendent in Kentucky, on his plans to retire at the end of 2015. From the Corbin Times-Tribune.
 
 
 
 
 
 
“We are very glad we are part of the group that got chosen. We’re also excited for the Harlan County School District as well, because they were also accepted. I think this will help our whole community — everyone involved, our families and our schools, deal with some of these extended days we have off. We look forward to implementing that. We have some professional development planned in the beginning of the school year to address this.” Harlan Independent Schools Superintendent C. D. Morton on the selection of both local districts to take part in the state’s nontraditional instruction day snowbound program for 2015-16. From the Harlan Daily Enterprise.
 
“Even if we hit our projection on the number (of students), we don’t know how much experience teachers bring. If we hire new teachers, if they are straight out of college and don’t have much experience, we’ll save money on the salary and benefits line. If they are veterans coming to us from another district, we pay for that experience.” Shelby County Schools Superintendent James Niehof explaining one of the annual unknowns in building a district budget. From the Shelbyville Sentinel-News.
 
“There is screening in the tower to prevent birds from getting in, but apparently there was a small opening on the clock that they used to get in. There are literally buckets and buckets of bird feces that have to be properly removed.” Augusta Independent Schools Superintendent Lisa McCane on an added cost to a renovation project, including work on the school’s historic clock tower. From the Maysville Ledger-Independent.
 
“I feel that the cost for EPSB to remove the alert system for school districts seeking high-quality professional educators is much too high. We want to seek, attract and retain the best educators possible to work with our students, and that obligation requires all of us to set the bar high for whomever gets that privilege.” Webster County Schools Superintendent and Kentucky Association of School Superintendents President-elect Rachel Yarbrough on a decision by the state Education Professional Standards Board to end the practice of “flagging” files of certified employees who face an unresolved complaint related to their performance – a tool considered during the employment process. From the Lexington Herald-Leader.
 
“We do encourage the kids to make noise, make themselves appear bigger than they are. Making sure that our kids are safe, that’s the top priority, and being prepared for the unexpected, and that was certainly unexpected.” Arlie Boggs Elementary School (Letcher County) Principal Freddie Terry on steps he took after appearances by a mother bear and three cubs scrounging for food around the school’s dumpsters. From WYMT-TV in Hazard. 
Schools as voting sites
 “I know schools have traditionally served our communities in this way. However, if primary elections with such low turnout disrupt schools and families during prime instruction season for most districts, it’s time for a change. In some cases, this date fell during our state-mandated testing window. It’s time for all state legislators to find ways to keep schools open on primary election days in Kentucky.” Portion of Daviess County Schools Superintendent Owens Saylor’s letter to the editor on a law closing schools on election days.
 
“We have such a hard time finding polling places. We couldn’t have an election without using public buildings, buildings paid for by taxpayers. It would be a nightmare. Highland Elementary is in a huge precinct where a lot of people vote. If school was in session, it would be impossible for voters to find a parking place there. It would create a huge problem.” Daviess County Clerk David Osborne reacting to Saylor’s proposal.
 
From Owensboro Messenger-Inquirer.
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