People are Talking - June 2014

People are Talking - June 2014

People are Talking

People are Talking
"My client has pleaded not guilty. We’re trying to get him off the hook. I want to be a lawyer when I grow up. This way I could see if I was interested in it. I’m excited. I’m never done a trial before and I haven’t watched much ‘Judge Judy.’” Bardstown Independent Middle School eighth-grader Channing Cahoe on preparing for his role as a defense attorney in an enrichment class mock trial based on Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart.” From the Bardstown Kentucky Standard. Photo provided by Bardstown Independent Schools
 
“There’s a circus at Diddle Arena that weekend and they said that they feel like they will need more than just one day to get it cleaned up for us.” Logan County Schools Superintendent Marshall Kemp on yet another of the unusual factors impacting this year’s high school graduation timing following winter weather calendar shuffles. From the Russellville News-Democrat & Leader.
 
“It’s a first, and how many firsts do you get?” Ashland Independent Schools Superintendent Steve Gilmore on the decision to hold last month’s high school graduation at the city’s riverfront park due to ongoing renovations at the traditional site, the school’s football stadium. From the Ashland Independent.
 
“It goes against our founding principles of one vote, one person. It’s intended to apply — I don’t want to say to an individual — but it would affect any individual who is elected or appointed to a board (with the ability to) levy taxes. At the time, I was like, ‘That’s an incompatible office,’ but as we researched into the statutes, we found that in that set of circumstances, it was not prohibited. I thought that was an oversight in the compatibility clause, so we revised it.” State Rep. Ken Upchurch of Monticello on his sponsorship of a new law that would bar anyone from serving on more than one government board that can levy taxes. From the Somerset Commonwealth Journal.
 
“I do (think I was targeted). I thought absolutely ... it had to be some blowback from the people trying to close the library two years ago. It’s an awfully strange coincidence. There are not many coincidences in life.” Somerset Independent Board of Education member Elaine Wilson, who also serves on the Pulaski County Library Board, and hopes she will not be forced to resign either post. From the Somerset Commonwealth Journal.
 
“We just want our students to come in and focus on their academics so they don’t have to worry about what’s going to happen at school. (It) limits distractions they have to worry about (and) gives parents a sense of security that the school and the city are doing everything possible to keep their kids safe.” Beechwood Independent School Superintendent Steve Hutton, right, on why his district and the city of Fort Thomas want to create a school resource officer post. From the Fort Mitchell Community Press & Recorder.
 
“In order for us to get where we need to be, we need two things, the nickel must remain on the table and the additional assistance of $14 million so generously offered by our legislators. If the nickel is recalled through petition and ballot, we’ll not see a dime in funding assistance beyond the current bonding of $9 million. I urge the people of Martin County to carefully consider the impact to our children before saying no to a new high school facility.” Martin County Schools Superintendent Steve Meadows in a letter urging citizens to reject a recall petition aimed at the school board’s nickel facilities tax, needed to replace the abandoned high school. From the Louisa Big Sandy News.
 
“I find a school board truly represents the taxpayers who fund the school district. You have to have that catalyst. We’re the piece that gives the local taxpayers their say. We (school board members) focus on the business. We all have the same desire for education.” Bowling Green Independent Board of Education Vice Chairwoman Deborah Williams commenting on a national study that questioned whether school board leadership matters in today’s society. From the Bowling Green Daily News.
 
“Without a school board, what voice would parents and students have? We have an education mindset. The education part will always be part of the table. We want what is best for the children.” Warren County Board of Education Chairman Kerry Young on the same issue. Also from the Bowling Green Daily News.
 
“If you are repeating a grade, your focus probably should not be on sports. Your focus should be on remediation of your academic work or whatever was the reason; it shouldn’t be simply so you can be a scholarship athlete by the time you are a senior.” Kentucky High School Athletic Association Commissioner Julian Tackett on a new state regulation prohibiting middle school students who repeat a grade for any reason from playing on a school athletic team in the year they are repeating. From the Lexington Herald-Leader
“I get more out of this than listening to someone read for 20 minutes. It’s their chance to show off the highlights of their schools. You see the pride in these children’s faces.” Christian County Board of Education Chairwoman Linda Keller, left, on the new roundtable format for the district’s 17 school councils to make their annual improvement plan reports, a process that included student presenters. From the Hopkinsville Kentucky New Era.
 
“School districts constitute a specialized industry that requires auditor expertise and training to ensure audit quality. The firms that perform these engagements are primarily local firms with partners who focus on governmental engagements. Depending on the size of the district, there may only be a limited number of firms in Kentucky with the ability to perform a quality audit in a timely and efficient manner.” Portion of a statement by the Kentucky Society of CPAs contesting a recommendation by the State Committee for School District Audits that school boards select a new auditor after five years, regardless of whether there had been audit problems. From the KSBA eNews Service.
 
“We are unaware of any other school district in southeast Kentucky or of our size that offers its students the opportunity to benefit from community, private and public higher education. We have a great response to our college offerings from Southeast and Union, and this partnership will allow even more students the opportunity to earn dual credit and develop study skills and habits that are necessary for college.” Knox County Schools Superintendent Kelly Sprinkles on a dual-credit agreement with Eastern Kentucky University, similar to its partnerships with Union College and Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College. From the Corbin Times-Tribune.
 
“The success speaks for itself and you want to show off those sites that are successful and say, ‘Here are the sites where they are taking care of business.’ It’s a lot of fun to go on the road, though, because a lot of times, this marks the first time we get to meet the superintendent and some of the district’s principals and central office staff, at their home sites. This is where you build relationships.” Kentucky Department of Education Associate Commissioner David Couch on the selection of Murray Independent High School for one of the agency’s remote “ed tech webcasts” on school technology issues. From the Murray Ledger & Times.
 
“We recognize that social media plays a significant role in the way our students communicate with each other. It is a concern for us, the rapid pace. We are learning to deal with that. So every time we have one of these events, we come back together to see ... what kind of an impact did that have, and what can we do differently to support our students.” Jefferson County Schools psychologist Joe Bargione on a review of the district’s response after a student posted a suicide note online that was seen by other students at school under a limited access policy. From the Louisville Courier-Journal.
 
“They (KDE) recommend that you only spend 75 percent (of the budget) in wages for teachers. Last year we were at 85 percent and it eats the budget quickly. This year we’re at 80 percent. Next year, when we have to confront the 2 percent (increase), we’ll have to be very careful. One teacher can make a huge difference. The problem is that our enrollment has gone down. Right now, you can’t really get a clear prediction (on next year).” East Bernstadt Independent Schools Superintendent Vickie Jones on budget-balancing challenges faced by her district. From the London Sentinel-Echo.
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